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if you look at the successful record of immigrants to the united states, whether skilled or unskilled, documented or undocumented, across the last 200 years and particularly in the last 25 years and with the great renaissance of data that we now have at our disposal to analyze more clearly the impact of all types of immigration from 1990 forward, we realize that immigrants, again, skilled and unskilled, lawful and undocumented, bring to the effort of community building and business building and economy building something that is moderately intangible for now. if we work at it for a few more years it will be tangible and we will be able to quantify part of it. it's something that represents itself in generational achievement both for those immigrants who arrive, who form small businesses at a rate which is disproportionately higher than native-born citizens, for their children that in turn achieve at a level that is higher on average than the children of native-born citizens, not to disparage those who come from the united states or come from long lines of families that come from the u
, in 1961, the cuban constitution was identical to that of the united states. those words in that constitution did not protect us. words do not protect you. understanding and be leaving in the words do. -- and believing in the words do. we today have a serious problem in that regard. the "new york times" three weeks ago -- "time" magazine three weeks ago reported as a cover story how the constitution is under siege, and "newsweek" about two months ago had a cover story about the failure of americans to understand our government. some very scary statistics. two out of every three graduating high-school students today believe that the three branches of government are republican, democrat, and independent. that is an actual poll. 75% of all americans don't know that religious freedom is protected by the first amendment. 75%. more americans can name the judges on "american idol" than on the supreme court of the united states. what does this mean to us? how did we get here? well, first of all, unless the next generation understands the obligations imposed by the constitution, w
't know is that the median income of lawyers in the united states is $62,000. they need to understand that before they incur $100,000 in debt. is there always room for another good lawyer? we need good lawyers. there always is. you have to ask yourself how much that you can afford -- how much debt you can afford. they have been watching too much "boston legal." you see $100,000 starting salaries. that may be for the top 10 students at the top 10 law schools. there were 30,000 graduates this year. what are the others going to do? there are jobs available and good jobs available, but we have to first let them know what to expect upon graduation. second thing we have to do is make sure we continue to have the profession look like our society. two spots of the examples. hispanic lawyers, less than 4%. 15% of our society. african americans come 8% come away under-represented. what we are doing in that regard as we have minority scholarships and a program where we put minority students with federal judges and state judges. we have a diversity center, which are the only four missions of the
.s. born workers in the united states from the 1990's to 2005 were better off because of the immigrant, both documented and undocumented, presence in the united states. their earnings were enhanced by about 2.7%. why? it's complicated and i'll send a link to the commission so you can look at the exciting charts and graphs and do that to your heart's desire. it comes down to a simple idea which is intuitive and you know it. the economy is not a fixed pie. when you expand the labor curve, a simple economist will say the price of labor goes down and we're all hurt. the more people that work here, the more people that are chasing jobs and we're all doomed. wrong. the expansion of the available labor force creates opportunities that did not exist before. you have innovation and entrepreneurialism that increases the actual size of small and medium-sized businesses. they consume and that expands the demand curve. you have a dynamic economy for 90% of u.s. born workers that enhances their wages. the other 9% got whacked up side the head with globalization and immigration and everything you can
million people live in the united states. and each person uses an average of 100 gallons of water every day. man: what it takes to actually make clean water is somewhat a mystery to most customers. woman: so how does water get from the river into your house, or here at school? woman: somebody has to bring that water to us, and somebody has to take it away when we're finished with it. man: the water infrastructure is vital for disease protection, fire protection, basic sanitation, economic development, and for our quality of life. man: you just can't visualize all the assets that are under our feet. we have about two million miles of pipe in this nation. if you're walking around in an urban area, you're probably stepping on a pipe. man: our grandparents paid for, and put in for the first time, these large distribution systems. woman: and in many cases, it's not been touched since. man: we're at a critical turning point. much of that infrastructure is wearing out. narrator: our water infrastructure is made up of complex, underground systems that function continuously. these 10 locations t
, in order for the united states to prosper, we need lots of swimmers who are willing to get in the water and swim and save nothing for the trip back because they are the type of person who will do whatever it takes, work as hard as is needed and get to the other side without saving energy to get back. and this shows up in what we now have as the crystal clear data in the last several years largely funded by the kaufman foundation out of kansas city and augmented by others. two important findings that i hope you take you that will augment the even more compelling stories about people and families and the appreciation of the human situation and that is, first, 91% of those u.s. born workers in the united states from the 1990's to 2005 were better off because of the immigrant, both documented and undocumented, presence in the united states. their earnings were enhanced by about 2.7%. why? it's complicated and i'll send a link to the commission so you can look at the exciting charts and graphs and do that to your heart's desire. it comes down to a simple idea which is intuitive and you know
that operating domestically and the investigative authority within the united states. we would be helpless if we did not work with dhs, cia, nsa, and the rest of the intelligence community. if there is one substantial change that has made the biggest difference, i would say breaking down the traditional walls between the intelligence community and the domestic law enforcement community because information flows very easily over borders now, and you cannot just see one piece of the puzzle without getting the other piece. it has made a tremendous difference and given rise to the approach from all of us that says we want to work together in a task force context. >> for our radio listeners, you are listening to the commonwealth club of california radio program. our guest today is fbi director robert muller discussing security threats concerning the united states. we would like to ask you a little bit about the national security implications of our energy policy, an issue of much concern in the news and certainly here in silicon valley. what might you say about the relationship between energy policy
for san francisco to continue to be one of the most educated cities in the united states. we are proud to have them here this evening. we would like to thank mayor lee. we would like to thank our friends with the fund and also the san francisco giants for allowing us to show you our all- star team this evening. we also want to thank each and everyone of you for trusting your children to us every single day. i can tell you with complete confidence that they are in very, very good hands. thank you on behalf of the 56,000 students in san francisco. thank you and congratulations to our all-star team, our teachers. >> thank you so much. how about a big round of applause as we celebrate our teachers tonight? [applause] >> good evening, and welcome to tonight's meeting of the commonwealth club of california, the place where you are in the know. >> you just said this is where we came in. >> is this a trick? you can find us on the internet. i am from kcbs radio. your moderator. this is part of the good lit series. now it is my pleasure to introduce our special guest today, d and alan zweibel. t
, 25% of publicly traded companies in the united states are essentially from the bay area region and one out of four was started by an immigrant. we have great data on this because it's all transparent. you can look it up. you can tabulate it. it's all a list of companies that we own, from google to intel, we know these companies. here is what you don't know but you kind of know if you just look around. in the next two years, we'll have much better data on. that is at the small and medium sized, it turns out that same disproportionate effort of immigrants forming businesses that by the way small businesses are what employ people and grow the economy, immigrants form a disproportionate number of those businesses. we know that what does that mean? well, i think you already know the story about why a good person will think immigration is a good idea and why a smart government will welcome as many people based on the success of its history, but maybe what you can take away from this is that even if you're not a good person, even if you're not into happy people and cultural diversity
in the united states. it is a historical japanese- style garden, originally billed as a village for the 1894 midwinter international exposition. after the exposition, a japanese-american partner along with john mclaren converted the exhibition into a permanent park. he over saw the building as the teagarden and was the official caretaker from -- until 1925. he requested the people of japan 1000 flooring cherry trees to be imported and other plants and birds and goldfish. his family lived in the garden until 1942. when under executive order 906, he was forced to relocate to an internment camp with thousands of other japanese american families. this barden was renamed the oriental tea garden and it fell into a state of disrepair. in the 1950's, we had moved forward and the rec and park renamed it the japanese tea garden. the first concessionaire was jack -- who many here had the incredible opportunity to honor. and we're very incredibly pleased to be planning -- planting a cherry tree from the consul general. the cherry blossom tree planting has become a tradition that allows us to reflect on
the criminal division. in 1998, bob returned to san francisco as united states attorney. please join me in welcoming my good friend and one of america's most distinguished public servants, robert muller. [applause] >> let me start off by thanking mason for that kind introduction. i will say -- you often wonder when a former professor is going to introduce you. you do not know what is going to come out. but, thank you. you were there to kick start my career when it needed kick starting. let me thank the commonwealth club for having me back. it is great to be back in san francisco but also to be back with you this afternoon. two months ago, we marked the 10th anniversary of the september 11 attacks. the horrific events of that day were the prelude to a decade of political, economic, and cultural transformation, and globalization and technology have accelerated these changes. consider now how different our world was in the summer of 2001. leaders of egypt, iraq, and libya were entrenched in power. barack obama was an illinois state senator, and arnold schwarzenegger was a movie actor. 10 y
venezuela, bolivia. as well as in china, japan, the united states europe. the middle east. africa. all of them cannot despise their resistance. despite their refusal stop that march of death. despite their resistance. communists repressives. zionists and anarchists. none can evade the march. this one is not coming with hammer and sickles . all wars surrender to. but when comes the cry? when will it really happen as death is peace? when can i truly die. you will never know yet you may have already and this life is your way of paying hommage to the power that loves and you left you with the taste of immortality on your lips. nothing mystical. no cries. power, your way. or buddha in the wings. even lying on your back, you are mocking. this is not a cynical, or pessimist or neonnist poem. join deaths to your life and you will live as if there 1 drum to march to. there is no march at all. you are there. all will be well for all. [applause]. >> >> >> >> >> i would like to tell you my experience -- when i first came here, i was the first philippino librarian. i said why don't we have a rece
's equality movement in the united states. >> at that time, women were banned from holding property and voting in elections. >> susan b. anthony dedicated her life to reform. >> suffrage in the middle of the 19th century accomplished one goal, it was diametrically opposed to this idea. >> many feared it would be corrupted by politics. >> women in the 19th century had to convince male voters that having the vote would not change anything. that woman would still be devoted to the home, the family, that they would remain pure and innocent, that having the vote would not corrupt them. >> support gradually grew in state and local campaigns. >> leaders like ellen clark sgt come repeatedly stopping these meetings -- , repeatedly stopping these meetings as a politically active figure. doing everything they could to ground the campaign in domesticity. >> despite their efforts, the link made it tough whenever voters were in the big city. a specialist in francisco. >> the problem with san francisco is that women's suffrage as an idea was associated. >> susan b. anthony joined the provision party. a deadl
to the united states -- november 1981 and came to the united states. i have been a resident of san francisco or the past few years. -- for the past 20 years. in my immigration practice, which i started with the help of the immigrant resource center, who was trying to help low- income immigrants adjust to life in the u.s. new life after amnesty, a lot of people were not able to immigrate because of a lack of money. still to this point, i see a lot of immigrants who want to get their work permits. i ask them how long they have been here. sometimes they have been here since the 1970's, 1980's, 1990's. a lot of them are elderly who are ready to retire. i had 165-year-old man who is alone, no family -- a 65-year- old man who is alone, no family here, but he does not have any papers to get that social security that he has contributed to for 30 years. he will be homeless after working for many years. i faced this situation with my clients a lot. i help low income people. sometimes it is very difficult. sometimes i think about how small the world is a and i see how immigration laws are changing. imm
the whole united states and in front of the company could tell, i was listening to him speak about san francisco. he said, "i traveled to every city in the united states, and i was disappointed with what i saw. there was not one city that i liked, but as far as i'm concerned, san francisco is so beautiful that i would like to design 15 cities in russia that look like san francisco." [laughter] and he was right. [applause] my wonderful wife, my family is here. i'm thrilled. thank you very much. i must say -- excuse me, i have to mention one thing. i have never seen anything in my life as beautiful as these young people. [applause] you stand so beautiful. [applause] -- you sang so beautiful. [applause] >> it is tony bennett day in san francisco. [applause] just fantastic. now, before we leave here today, just one more time, let's hear that special song one more time, now performed by the talented san francisco gay men's chorus, who will be joined by -- yes -- who will be joined by all of our performers here today and then all of you. you can sing along by following the lyrics on the scre
trial. the united states supreme court reversed the verdict of the jury in this decision. he has found an organization called resurrection after exoneration to help other people seek justice in their respective cases. to his left -- this is the executive director of california death penalty focus, where she works to abolish the death penalty. she did preside as the warden over several executions. natasha is the death penalty policy director for the american civil liberties union of northern california. she previously worked as a deputy public defender in alameda county, and was a staff attorney with the california task force on criminal instructions. she is also working on the effort to abolish the death penalty in california and pursuing the goal of reforming capital sentencing procedure. before we start with the first question, we have a short video. i have been told that this is a video from the former warden of the mississippi prison. >> it is clear that the execution will take place and something happens. they may not come out and say that they did this, but they will tell the vic
to the city because after 160 years, a san francisco is the asian american capital of the united states. 2012 has been an amazing year. when i was a little kid, i liked to play basketball. my mom said, david, stop playing basketball because no asian- american will ever get into the nba. mom was wrong. i know many of us thought that asian-americans with advance foreign politics, but i don't think that any of us thought that this year, we would see the first elected asian-american sworn in at city hall. and because of that, i want to take a moment and think of you. none of us would be here hall stage but for your stories, the challenges that the community has faced in surpassed. and diversity of the committee, we are moving forward. >> i just want to thank everybody for having all of us here. how to be honest, i did not prepare a speech, but it truly is an honor to serve the city. it is not often that we have a city that is so beautiful and wonderful and also a place for immigrants to be able to serve. i am honored to serve alongside the mayor and my colleagues on the board of supervisors. i th
the tallest dome built in the united states. it's now stands 307 feet 6 inches from the ground 40 feet taller than the united states capital. >> you could spend days going around the building and finding something new. the embellishment, the carvings, it represents commerce, navigation, all of the things that san francisco is famous for. >> the wood you see in the board of supervisor's chambers is oak and all hand carved on site. interesting thing about the oak is there isn't anymore in the entire world. the floors in china was cleard and never replanted. if you look up at the seceiling you would believe that's hand kof carved out of wood and it is a cast plaster sealing and the only spanish design in an arts building. there are no records about how many people worked on this building. the workman who worked on this building did not all speak the same language. and what happened was the person working next to the other person respected a skill a skill that was so wonderful that we have this masterpiece to show the world today. >> tonight, we paid for the two teachers, especially those in sa
% of the water consumed in the united states. water is the basis for manufacturing many goods and provides the ability to clean and sterilize everything from computer chips to the surgical instruments used in hospitals. kelly: the minute that there's not enough water for businesses, industry, and individuals, they have to go elsewhere. and when they go elsewhere, jobs go elsewhere. your entire economy begins to suffer with the lack of clean water. narrator: while the water infrastructure provides for our health, safety, and economy, a growing concern is that the value society derives from water has not traditionally been reflected in the price we pay for water. man: when you take a look at how much people pay for water, as a percentage of median household income, it's usually less than 1%. and when you compare that to how much we pay for electricity and gas, cable tv, and internet, the bottom line is, in the united states, we don't pay a heck of a lot for water. curtis: at an average cost of about $2.50 for 1,000 gallons of tap water, it is a great bargain. garvin: but the rates that are b
each other. many people say that the united states should be a melting pot, and i do not believe in the melting pot theory. when you have a melting pot, you put all of the ingredients into the bowl, stir it up, and everybody loses their identity. in the asian pacific american community, there are over 150 languages, religions, cultures, everything you can think of, and we do not want to lose that identity of our own history, regardless of where our forefathers have come from. i want everybody to be proud of the language of their forebears, the religion, the history, the culture, the art. again, i do not want us to lose our identity in the community in this great nation. again, thank you very, very much for great leadership, to the board for this wonderful gift bestowed upon me, and let's go ahead and continue to hit the ball out of the ballpark. thank you very much. [applause] >> ladies and gentlemen, we are going to bring up our founded to say a few last words, but before he speaks, we would like all the previous speakers to come up for a photo with the board, so if the board me
to state that was initially three units, two residential and one commercial, and i would support the legalization. president hwang: do you want to make a motion? vice president fung: i will move to overturn the the department on the basis that the 1952 permit was used to legalize something that showed up in the previous documentation with the assessor's office and that it was representing the legalization of the third unit. secretary pacheco: we have a motion from commissioner fung to grant the appeal and overrule the denial and grant the permit, and i believe, commissioner fung, said you're finding was that the 1954 permit -- 1950 to permit was to legalize the second residential units. on that motion, by the vice president, to grant this appeal without finding, president hwangm commissioner hillism commissioner hurtado, the denial is overruled with that finding. >> thank you, commissioners. i would also like to thank mr. duffy. director goldstein: item number 7 has been withdrawn, so there is no further business this evening. president hwang: so we are adjourned. [gavel] >> the
but i will support and defend the constitution of the united states and the constitution of the state of california against all enemies, foreign and domestic, that will bear -- to the constitution of the united states and the constitution of the state of california. that i take this obligation freely without any mental reservation or purpose of evasion. i will faithfully discharge the duties upon which i am about to enter during such time as i hold the office of -- for the city and county of san francisco. congratulations and thank you. [applause] >> to introduce this illustrates how, please welcome the ceo of our nation's second-largest green builder, a member of the silicon valley leadership group border directors, and the ceo of webcor builders andy ball. >> thank you [applause] -- thank you. [applause] welcome back to our third session. i hope you enjoy the first two as much as i did. i think we found out how much of a character governor brown can be we are going to talk about silicon valley and the bay area innovation to the economy today. as you look at the panel, t
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 364 (some duplicates have been removed)